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Cello Fingerboard Map: First to Seventh Position (Updated 2020 Version)

Whether you’re finding your way around first position or you’re venturing into the tenor and treble clef registers, an understanding of the note layout is essential. The more demanding your repertoire, the more you need a detailed internal ‘sat-nav’ to find your way effortlessly through challenging passages. The less you have to calculate your route map, the more you can focus on musical shaping, phasing and interpretation.

The map below is a visual aid to indicate the location and content of each position from first (including half) to seventh. You’ll notice that some positions go by 2 names (e.g. upper first/ lower second), and some of the notes on the fingerboard include enharmonic equivalents (different letter name for the same pitch). Positions are named according to the note names they accommodate. For example, the notes in upper first position on the A string are B#, C#, D and D# – predominantly the same letter names as those in first position, while lower second position – C, Db, D, Eb share the letter names of upper second position. As a rule, positions with the upper label tend to favour sharps, while those with the lower label favour flats.

Cello Fingerboard Map 2020

 

Further posts on cello positions:
An Overview of the Neck Positions
An Introduction to Stretch Position
An Introduction to the Three Finger Positions

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© D C Cello Studio

Back to Blogging

A brief post for now.

Yes, it has been several years since I last opened this blog editor and filled it with cello-y things. I have continued to be very busy doing cello-y things, but lost my blogging mojo along the way. So here I am, hoping to regain that mojo. My chief motivation to reawaken The Cello Companion is to share with you a project (cellocentric of course) that my other half and I have been working on.

In short, it’s an antidote to the increasingly fractious, divided world in which we find ourselves. 16 short pieces for cello and piano, each a gentle journey into a sensory realm. No, we’re not suggesting our latest works are the key to world peace. Instead, they are brief opportunities to step out of the stressful now and enter whichever peaceful dimension unfolds through the music.

So, the following posts will present each of the tracks. I sincerely hope they have the soothing effect they’re intended to. If they do, please help us to spread them further afield. Email a video link to a friend who’s having a rough day. Share on your social media page and/or group. And please subscribe to our channel and like the videos.